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Environmental Weeds

What are weeds?

Weeds are plants growing where they do not belong, such as in natural bushland, waterways or your garden.

Noxious weeds are listed under the Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (CaLP Act) and landowners are required to control them.

Environmental weeds cause problems in bushland reserves and gardens. Some environmental weeds, such as blackberry or broom, are also considered noxious weeds.

Why are weeds a problem?

Environmental weeds are considered a problem because they invade bushland, taking over from indigenous (naturally occurring) species, or preventing their regeneration.

Most indigenous wildlife living in Maroondah depend on indigenous vegetation. Therefore, loss of bushland can lead to local extinction of our birds and animals.

How to manage weeds

With many weeds spreading from residential gardens, tracks and roadsides into surrounding bushland, we can all play a part in managing them.

The best way to manage weeds is to remove them as soon as they appear in your garden or target them before they begin their seeding period.

Below we have listed the most common and problematic weeds in Maroondah. For further information on weed identification, control measures and appropriate herbicides contact Maroondah Council's Bushland team on 9294 5677 or the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning Customer Service Centre on 136 186.

For advice on suitable replacement plants and species that are indigenous to Maroondah, contact Candlebark Community Nursery on 9727 0594 or Crisp Indigenous Plant Nursery on 9879 3911.

Weed management responsibilities

Generally it is the responsibility of the land owner or occupier of the land to manage weeds growing on their property and ensure they do not escape into neighbouring properties.

** A permit for tree removal may be required to remove these weeds/plants. Further information on permit requirements is available on our Tree Removal page or by contacting Council’s Environment Planning team on 1300 88 22 33.

Use the guide below to help identify and manage weeds in your neighbourhood:

Climbers and creepers 

Blackberry – Rubus fructicous
Flowering time:
early summer
Seeding time: berries late summer to early autumn
Control time: October to April
Control techniques: cut stems on aerial growth, spray, dig out 

Blackberry 

Cleavers – Galium aparine
Flowering time:
late winter to early spring
Seeding time: summer
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand or spray

Cleaver 

English Ivy Hedera helix
Flowering time:
late autumn to winter
Seeding time: berries in winter to spring (regrows from small pieces)
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, cut stems on aerial growth, spray

English Ivy 

Japanese Honeysuckle  Lonicera japonica
Flowering time: spring to summer
Seeding time: berries in late summer to autumn (also reproduces vegetatively)
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, cut stems on aerial growth, spray

Japanese Honeysuckle 

Grasses, bulbs and groundcover

Panic Veltd Grass  Ehrharta erecta
Flowering time: all year
Seeding time: all year
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, spray
Panic Veldt 

Angled onion  Allium triquetrum
Flowering time: winter to spring (strong onion smell)
Seeding time: late spring to summer
Control time: April to August
Control techniques: remove by hand, spray, dig out

Angled onion 

Soursob  Oxalis pes-caprae
Flowering time:
spring (yellow flower)
Seeding time: summer
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, spray 

Soursob 

White Arum Lily Zantedeschia aethiopica
Flowering time: late winter to early spring
Seeding time: late spring to early summer
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, spray 

White arum lily 

Monbretia  Crocosmia x crocosmiiflora
Flowering time: spring to summer
Seeding time: autumn (also reproduces by corms)
Control time: August to September
Control techniques: remove by hand, dig out, spray 

Monbretia 

Sweet Vernal Grass Anthoxanthum odoratum
Flowering time: all year
Seeding time: all year
Control time: winter to spring
Control techniques: remove by hand, spray 

Sweet Vernal Grass 

Trees and scrubs 

** Privet Ligustrum lucidum
Flowering time:
spring to summer
Seeding time: berries in winter
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, cut stems on aerial growth, drill and fill 

Privet 

** Sweet Pittosporum – Pittosporum undulatum
Flowering time: early spring
Seeding time: autumn to winter
Control time: all year
Control techniques: remove by hand, cut stems on aerial growth, drill and fill 

Sweet Pittosporum 

Other weeds of concern

  • Pale wood-sorrel (Oxalis incarnata)
  • Common cat’s ear (Hypochoeris radicata)
  • Creeping buttercup (Ranunculus repens)
  • Fumitory (Fumeria officinalis)
  • Agapanthus (Agapanthus praecox subsp orientalis)
  • Annual mercury (Mercurialis annua)
  • Bluebell creeper (Billardiera heterophylla) (formerly Sollya heterophylla)
  • Blue periwinkle (Vinca major)
  • Bridle creeper (Asparagus asparagoides)
  • Cape ivy (Delairia odorata)
  • Common onion grass (Romulea rosea var. australis)
  • Common vetch (Vicia sativa subsp. Sativa)
  • Drain sedge (Cyperus eragrostis)
  • ** Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster sp.)
  • St Peter’s wort (Hypericum tetrapterum)
  • Wandering trad (Tradescantia fluminensis)
  • ** Coastal wattle
  • ** Sallow wattle (Acacia longifolia var. sophorae var. longifolia)
  • Watercress (Nasturtium officinale)
  • Large quaking grass (Briza maxima)
  • Watsonia (Watsonia meriana var. bulbillifera)
  • Brooms and Gorze – (English broom, Montpellier broom and Gorze) (Cytisus scoparius, Genista monspessulana, Ulex europaeus)
  • Asparagus fern (Asparagus aethiopicus)

Community action

Council is lucky to have many dedicated residents and natural environment community groups to assist with weed management on public land. Maroondah City Council supports these efforts by composting weeds that are collected by Council and community groups. We encourage residents to manage weeds on their own properties and join in established natural environment community groups to help stop environmental weeds from damaging the biodiversity in our local area.

Replacements for pest plants

An important part of weed management is using replacement plants that do not pose a problem. By choosing hardy indigenous plants species grown from seed collected within the region, residents can create a habitat for local animals and birds and contribute to our local landscape.

Indigenous nurseries which stock appropriate plans for replacement planting include:

Candlebark Community Nursery

Address: corner Hull Road and Taylor Road, Mooroolbark (Entry off Hull Road)
Phone: 9727 0594
Email: info@candlebark.org.au
Website: www.candlebark.org.au

Crisp Indigenous Plant Nursery

Address: 17 Greenwood Avenue, Ringwood
Phone: 9879 3911
Email: crisp@melb.org.au
website: www.crispnursery.org.au



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